FNR 20 years: An evening with science [fiction] in the House of Frankenstein

 

On Friday, 29 November 2019, on the occasion of the 20 year existence of the FNR, the FNR organised an off-beat event – The House of Frankenstein – where citizens and scientists came together to immerse themselves in some of the biggest controversial science topics facing society, such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), genome editing, gender balance and the use of space resources. Join us on a journey as we revisit the evening.

An evening with science [fiction] in the House of Frankenstein

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